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Executive Board
Dr. Craig Browne Ed.D
President

Dr. William Taylor III
1st Vice President

Sandra Jenkins
2nd Vice President
Geraldine Brown
Education Comm.
Frederica D. Hale
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"New" NAACP Garnformation contact
Cheltenham Branch Box 151
Wyncote, PA. 19095

215-576-8323 * 215-572-7510 fax cheltennaacp@comcast.net
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NAACP
CHELTENHAM AREA BRANCH
NEWS

 

    NAACP HEALTH GOAL
develop national health education initiatives; expand community outreach; and sponsor
collaborative programs with other national and local health organizations.

The NAACP is committed to eliminating the racial and ethnic disparities in our health care system that plague people of color in the United States. African Americans continue to have the highest incidence, prevalence and mortality rates from chronic diseases like cardiovascular disease, diabetes and obesity. Additionally issues like HIV and infant mortality have continued to overwhelm the Black community. Systemic imbalances in the health care delivery system disproportionately affect African Americans and Latinas more than their White counterparts.

In addition the NAACP is engaged in the workforce development movement to increase the number of minorities represented in the medical and public health profession, and a leading presence on governmental advisory workgroups and national coalitions developed to provide counsel on cultural competency in the health care system. read more click here.


LOCAL RESOURCES

Montgomery County Health Department---It is the mission of the Montgomery County Health Department to assure the provision of services that promote, protect and preserve the public's health. click here

Montgomery County Health Department News/Alerts Your Partner for a healthy community
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What is AIDS?

AIDS - the acquired immuned efficiency syndrome - is a disease you get when HIV destroys your body's immune system. Normally, your immune system helps you fight off illness. When your immune system fails you can become very sick and can die.

HIV can be passed from person to person if someone with HIV infection has sex with or shares drug injection needles with another person. It also can be passed from a mother to her baby when she is pregnant, when she delivers the baby, or if she breast feeds her baby. read more click here CDC

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus)

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system produces antibodies to cells within the body leading to widespread inflammation and tissue damage. The causes of SLE are unknown but are believed to be linked to genetic, environmental, and hormonal factors. SLE may be characterized by periods of illness and remissions. SLE has a variety of clinical manifestations and can affect joints, skin, brain, lungs, kidneys, and blood vessels. People with SLE may experience fatigue, pain or swelling in joints, skin rashes, and fevers. A team approach in treating lupus is often warranted due to the number of organ systems involved. read more click here CDC
Heart Disease

In the United States, the most common type of heart disease is coronary artery disease (CAD), which can lead to heart attack. You can greatly reduce your risk for CAD through lifestyle changes and, in some cases, medication.

Coronary artery disease can cause a heart attack. If you have a heart attack, you are more likely to survive if you know the signs and symptoms , call 9-1-1 right away, and get to a hospital quickly. People who have had a heart attack can also reduce the risk of future heart attacks or strokes by making lifestyle changes and taking medication. read more click here CDC

Asthma

Asthma is a disease that affects your lungs. It causes repeated episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and nighttime or early morning coughing. Asthma can be controlled by taking medicine and avoiding the triggers that can cause an attack. You must also remove the triggers in your environment that can make your asthma worse.

Asthma cannot be cured, but it can be controlled. School children with asthma need to know how to control their asthma. They may also need to be able to use their asthma medications at school. read more click here CDC

Sickle cell

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a group of inherited red blood cell disorders. In SCD, the red blood cells become hard and sticky and look like a C-shaped farm tool called a "sickle."

People with SCD can live full lives and enjoy most of the activities that other people do. If you have SCD, it's important to learn how to stay as health as possible. read more click here CDC

Stroke

Stroke is a leading cause of death in the United States. Over 800,000 people die in the U.S. each year from cardiovascular disease and strokes. 1

A stroke, sometimes called a brain attack, occurs when a clot blocks the blood supply to the brain or when a blood vessel in the brain bursts. You can greatly reduce your risk for stroke through lifestyle changes and, in some cases, medication.

Stroke can cause death or significant disability, such as paralysis, speech difficulties, and emotional problems. Some new treatments can reduce stroke damage if patients get medical care soon after symptoms begin. When a stroke happens, it is important to recognize the symptoms, call 9-1-1 right away, and get to a hospital quickly. more info. click here CDC

Hypertension & High Blood pressure

About 1 in 3 U.S. adults—as estimated 68 million—have high blood pressure 1 , which increases the risk for heart disease and stroke, leading causes of death in the United States. 2

High blood pressure is called the "silent killer" because it often has no warning signs or symptoms, and many people don't realize they have it. That's why it's important to get your blood pressure checked regularly.

The good news is that you can take steps to prevent high blood pressure, or to treat it if it is already high. read more click here CDC

Obesity health Consequences

Research has shown that as weight increases to reach the levels referred to as "overweight" and "obesity,"* the risks for the following conditions also increases: 1

  • Coronary heart disease
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Cancers (endometrial, breast, and colon)
  • Hypertension (high blood pressure)
  • Dyslipidemia (for example, high total cholesterol or high levels of triglycerides)
  • Stroke
  • Liver and Gallbladder disease
  • Sleep apnea and respiratory problems
  • Osteoarthritis (a degeneration of cartilage and its underlying bone within a joint)
  • Gynecological problems (abnormal menses, infertility) read more click here CDC
The Ben Carson Story

Ben Carson was born in Detroit, Michigan, on September 18, 1951. His mother, though undereducated herself, pushed her sons to read and to believe in themselves. Carson went from a poor student to an honors one, going on to medical school and becoming Director of Pediatric Neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital at age 33. He became famous for his ground-breaking work separating conjoined twins. read more click here
   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



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